About

Greendale

Village of Greendale Wisconsin

Greendale is a village in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 14,405 at the 2000 census.

History

Greendale was settled in 1938 as a public cooperative community in the New Deal Era. Construction of the new town would create jobs and thus help stimulate the national economic recovery following the Great Depression.

Greendale, which provided good housing at reasonable rents for moderate income urban families, was one of three “greenbelt” towns planned beginning in 1935 under the direction of Rexford Guy Tugwell, head of the United States Resettlement Administration, under authority of the Emergency Relief Appropriation Act. The two other greenbelt towns are Greenbelt, Maryland (near Washington, D.C.) and Greenhills, Ohio (near Cincinnati). The greenbelt towns not only provided work and affordable housing, but also served as a laboratory for experiments in innovative urban planning. Greendale’s plan was designed between 1936 and 1937 by a staff headed by Joseph Crane, Elbert Peets, Harry Bentley, and Walter C. Thomas for a site that had formerly consisted of 3,400 acres (14 km2) of farmland.

Construction began on Greendale in July 1936 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and, despite a movers strike, the first courageous families moved in on April 30, 1938. The original downtown included a Village Hall, several businesses, and 572 living units in 366 buildings, each with an average of 5,000 square feet of space for lawns and gardens. The village included a tavern, movie theater, volunteer fire station, newspaper office (The Greendale Review), schools, cooperative market and beautiful stone carvings by Alonzo Hauser. The Farm Security Administration originally appointed Mr. Hauser to create the carvings for the village. Henry A. Wallace, who was at the time was the United States Secretary of Agriculture, toured the village upon its completion.

All of the property was owned by the government and then rented to families, based on income, housing need and family size. Income requirements were specific: a minimum annual income of $1,200 and a maximum of $2,700. Some exceptions were made for those with special skills such as medical doctors and other professionals. To prevent too rapid expansion, all new development was tightly controlled by Greendale residents through various homeowners associations, as well as the green belt of parkways surrounding the village.

In 1949 the Public Housing Administration gave Greendale residents the right to purchase their homes from the government. The transfer of ownership from the government to the people was largely complete by 1952

Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, visited the village early in its history.

Geography

Greendale is located at 42°56′15″N 87°59′49″W (42.937615, -87.996884). The Root River flows through the western part of the village.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 5.6 square miles (14.5 km2), of which, 5.6 square miles (14.5 km2) of it is land and 0.18% is water.

Arcturus

Arcturus

Arcturus (a Boo, a Boötis, Alpha Boötis) is the brightest star in the constellation Boötes. To the naked eye, orangey-yellow Arcturus has a visual magnitude of -0.04, making it the brightest star in the northern hemisphere and the fourth brightest star in the night sky, after -1.46 magnitude Sirius, -0.86 magnitude Canopus and -0.27 magnitude Alpha Centauri. However, Alpha Centauri is a bright binary star, whose unresolved components to the naked eye are both fainter than Arcturus. This makes Arcturus the third brightest individual star, just ahead of Alpha Centauri A (a Cen A), whose visual magnitude is -0.01.

Arcturus is visible from both hemispheres in the sky, as it is located less than 20 degrees north of the celestial equator. The star culminates at midnight on about the 30th April, being visible during the northern spring or the southern autumn. From the northern hemisphere, an easy way to find Arcturus is to follow the arc of the handle of the Big Dipper. By continuing in this path, one can find Spica, “Arc to Arcturus, then speed on to Spica.” The star is also a member of the Local Interstellar Cloud.